What the shift in quality reporting under MACRA could mean for your practice

As healthcare continues its shift from volume- to value-based care, the quality of care that you and your practice provide has never been more important. This focus on quality—and the quality metrics that support it—will not only change the way you care for your patients. It will also change the way you are compensated for that care.


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Safeguard your patients—and your practice—with chronic opioid therapy monitoring

As opioid-related deaths continue to rise in the U.S., primary care practices are on the front lines of what has become an unprecedented nationwide epidemic.1,2


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Knowing starts with the patient history

Advances in technology, genetic testing, and genomic medicine are revolutionizing patient care. Yet the mainstay of diagnostic work is still the patient history.


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The doctor really will see you now: 10 ways to improve patient satisfaction

Amid the uncertainty of the current healthcare landscape, one thing remains clear: keeping patients satisfied is essential to both patient health and the health of your practice. It can help boost patient referral and retention, save practice time, and affect reimbursement.


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Practice advancement: a multimarker strategy for CVD risk stratification

How many patients are you treating for heart disease or its warning signs, e.g., hypertension or hyperlipidemia? You probably know the number or have a general sense. Now, here’s the harder question: how many of those patients are at higher risk of their disease progressing or of having a heart attack or stroke? In other words, which patients should you be monitoring more closely?


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10 ways to motivate heart-healthy changes

With rates of diabetes and obesity on the rise,1 heart health may continue to be a growing concern for your practice. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is currently the leading cause of death in the U.S., killing more than 370,000 Americans a year.2


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Does your patient have a lipid problem you can’t see?

For years, the traditional lipid panel has been the standard of care for risk assessment and monitoring cardiovascular disease (CVD) or dyslipidemia, with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels being the main target of treatment. However, while a traditional lipid panel measures the amount of cholesterol and triglycerides within lipoprotein particles, additional diagnostic tests can help identify other risk factors, including the number of atherogenic particles and the size of these particles.


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Easy ways to keep your hard-working staff happier

Because they’re often your patients’ first impression of your practice, your staff can play a key role in patient perceptions of the quality of the care they receive. How can you keep those perceptions positive and increase patient satisfaction? Keep employees positive and satisfied, too. Boosting staff morale may increase productivity as well: a 2010 Gallup study found that the least happy and least engaged employees cost their organizations as much as $28,000 annually per person in lost productivity, compared to a mere $840 among the happiest workers.1


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Insulin resistance assessment: a powerful tool for inspiring change

You’ve seen hundreds of patients like him: late fifties, not as active as he used to be, gaining about 5 pounds a year the past few years. He’s a nonsmoker and complains of fatigue. His family has a history of diabetes and heart disease, but to date his labs have been unremarkable save for slightly elevated LDL-C (103 mg/dL). His LDL-C hasn’t concerned you because his HDL-C is quite good (82 mg/dL) and his triglyceride level is well within standard range (93 mg/dL). His glucose and HbA1c are normal.


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Is your seemingly healthy patient at risk for CVD?

Model used for illustrative purposes. A previous Primary Insights post discussed the response-to-injury hypothesis in cardiovascular disease (CVD). The events leading to CVD are thought to begin with an injury to the arterial wall. Risk factors like smoking, hypertension, and diabetes can injure the arterial wall, making it more susceptible to penetration and accumulation of excess lipids.


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